peterwindsor.com

…chance doesn't exist; there's always a cause and a reason for everything – Elahi

Archive for the tag “Ford”

All four seasons in one day

24144.tifThe 1964 Daily Express International Trophy meeting at Silverstone for Jim Clark brought all four seasons in a day: on one brilliant uSaturday, in front of a packed crowd, Jim raced the F1 Lotus 25-Coventry-Climax, the Ian Walker Lotus-30-Ford, the Ford Lotus Cortina and the Ian Walker Lotus Elan-Ford 26R.  And then he rushed away for two days of testing at Indianapolis.

Images: LAT Photographic, The Henry Ford

24151.tif24171.tif

Identical attitudes from Mr Clark as he balances the Ian Walker Elan (left) and Lotus 30 (below) through Becketts. Both cars shared the same backbone-chassis principle. The IWR Elan always handled well (despite Jackie Stewart finding his Chequered Flag car very knife-edgy) and the 30, which flexed, was driveable in the wet and semi-wet (whenever its irascible mechanical components allowed). Jim adopts a similar pose with the Lotus 25 in the header: note that the left front Dunlop, mid-corner, is pointing in exactly the same direction as those of the Elan and the 30 – dead straight, in other words (and therefore textbook-perfect). In the Cortina (below) Jim was by contrast always playing with understeer 

24224.tif

Jim walks away…

1964 Aintree 200.

Milliseconds after being forced off-line, Jim spins to avoid Andre Pilette’s Scirocco-Climax at Melling Crossing

The Aintree 200 meeting 50 years ago was significant not only because it was the last major motor racing international staged at the racecourse owned by Mrs Mirabel Topham; it was also the scene of one of Jim Clark’s rare F1 accidents. Racing Jack Brabham hard for the lead, Jim was forced off-line by a back marker and spun heavily into the straw bails at Melling Crossing. His new Lotus 33 was destroyed, obliging Team Lotus to revert to the 25B for the opening rounds of the 1964 Championship. Earlier in the day, as we recount below, Jim finished second in the new Ian Walker-run Lotus 30 and won his class with the Ford Lotus Cortina.

1964 Aintree 200.

The brand new Lotus 33, featuring larger driveshafts and new ZF gearbox, was badly damaged

1964 Aintree 200.

“I was lucky to walk away from the wreck,” said Jim later. “The accident highlighted the dangers when lapping slower cars.”

23839_lowres

Jim debuted the new Lotus 30 at Aintree and finished second after starting from the back of the grid, setting fastest lap on the way. In terms of handling, though, the 30 was a long way from Bruce McLaren’s winning Zerex (now re-named “Cooper-Climax”)

23817_lowres-2

Jim won his class in the Aintree round of the British Touring Car Championship with the Ford Lotus Cortina. He pushed Sir Gawaine Baillie’s Galaxy hard but the big car always had the legs. Jim headed the other Cortinas driven by Peter Arundell, Frank Gardner and Jackie Stewart

 

The day he changed the world

IV_MDM_0914140114-PaddyPaddy Hopkirk’s win in the Monte-Carlo Rally 50 years ago was more than just another stat for the history books.  It was a ground-breaker, a medium for cultural change. For one thing, the Monte back then was really big – the biggest rally of the year and one of the most widely-covered international sporting events of western Europe’s new year. For another, he won in a Mini – in a Morris Cooper S, to be precise – and minis, at the point, were the thing, whether you were talking Mary Quant or Sir Alec Issigonis. The talk, before the Monte, was of the big Ford Falcon Sprints prepared by Holman and Moody in Charlotte, North Carolina (two of which were to be driven by Graham Hill and Bo Ljungfeldt) – and of the other rally-tuned classics:  the Ford (Dagenham) Cortina GTs of Vic Elford and Henry Taylor and of course Eric Carlsson’s Saab. It was Paddy, though, who on on handicap. He didn’t know he was close until he got to Monte-Carlo, where Bernard Cahier gave him the nod.  Then it was a matter of completing that final stage without incident. He did, complete with white shirt and tie – and thus he changed the world.  He received telegrams from the Prime Minister and from the Beatles.  His name would live on for longer than anyone could imagine.

I spoke to Paddy recently about that Monte win and what it meant to him – then and now.

A record-breaking (seventh) win

ACBCIt seems strange now but in 1963 it was part of motor racing tradition: Christmas and New Year meant South African sunshine. Read more…

More hectic than racing

Continuing our year-long diary of Jim Clark’s epic 1963 season. When we last reported, Jim had flown straight to Indianapolis from Mexico in order to test the new four-cam Ford V8 Lotus 29B. Read more…

Four cams…and telemetry

10853888855_0a2cac68c9_oIt was the 1960s…but the schedules – and the demands – were no less than today’s.

Immediately after winning the Mexican Grand Prix, Jim Clark, Dan Gurney and Colin Chapman flew to Indianapolis via Chicago. From the warmth of the Gulf to the chill of the mid-west. From a 1.5 litre Coventry Climax-engined Lotus 25 (or, in Dan’s case, Brabham BT7) to the new four-cam Indy Lotus 29-Ford.  To an empty, echo-ey Indianapolis Motor Speedway, where the bitter winter winds were already whistling around corners in Gasoline Alley.  To a full-on engine and tyre test in company with the Ford top brass and engineers from Goodyear, Firestone and Dunlop. Read more…

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: