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Kyalami 1978 revisited

Enjoy this hitherto little-seen colour AP Archive video of the 1978 South African GP at Kyalami. Niki Lauda stole the pole for Brabham-Alfa when no-one was looking on Friday morning; the race was led by Lauda, Mario Andretti, Jody Scheckter, Riccardo Patrese and Patrick Depailler; but it was Ronnie Peterson who seized the lead on the last lap to win for JPS Lotus. This video, which is an edited excerpt from our weekly live show, also includes short post-race interviews with both Peterson and Depailler, plus bonus additional footage from qualifying and some of my own photos from the famous Kyalami Ranch hotel.

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One of the greatest of F1 drives – Monaco, 1965

This race had it all. A titanic win for Graham Hill (father of Damon). In-fighting between the two very quick Ferrari drivers. A fast drive by a young rookie named Jackie Stewart. The debut of a future World Champion – Denis Hulme. Plus an F1 Lotus plunge into the Monte-Carlo harbour. In conjunction with APArchive, let’s re-live the 1965 Monaco GP… This video is an edited excerpt from Episode 05 of The Racer’s Edge Live. TRE Live is aired every Thursday on this channel from 18:00UK.

Click the F1 Store logo on the right here to access the official F1 merchandise store. Claim a 10 per cent discount with this code: WINDSOR10. All of our commissions go to the WESEEHOPE Covid19 emergency fund.

A surprise phone call to Ian Scott-Watson

We surprised Ian Scott-Watson on his 90th birthday by phoning him during The Racer’s Edge Live on April 23, 2020. Currently self-isolating in the house he designed himself in Greenlaw, near Duns, Scotland, Ian was largely responsible for bringing Jim Clark to the attention of the world at large and of Colin Chapman in particular. Ian recalls some of the fun days with Jim in the 1950s and 60s and nominates his all-time favourite road car. This video is an edited excerpt from The Racer’s Edge Live, which airs every Thursday at 18:00UK, but has been re-mixed to include little-seen footage from the 1965 German GP.

Click the F1 Store logo on the right here to access the official F1 merchandise store. Claim a 10 per cent discount with this code: WINDSOR10. All of our commissions go to the WESEEHOPE Covid19 emergency fund.

Chatting with Gordon Murray

It was, of course, a lot of fun to chat to the brazenly-creative Gordon Murray, the South African who came to Europe to design and build racing cars – and who went on to dominate the world. Gordon was working in a small office at Brabham, under Ron Tauranac, when Bernie Ecclestone bought that team in 1971 – and Ron’s advice at the time was to “sack Gordon”. Bernie’s natural instincts suggested otherwise. He gave the young engineer full control of the design office at Brabham – and two years later the team was winning Grands Prix with the ground-breaking, triangular-shaped Brabham BT42. With multi-world championships behind him at Brabham and McLaren, plus hundreds of other scintillating road cars and road car designs, not the least of which was the McLaren F1, Gordon today runs his highly-successful Gordon Murray Design studio in Shalford, Surrey, England – adjacent to the site where John Barnard designed and produced the Ferrari F189-640 F1 car and to where the race-winning, Enrique Scalabroni-developed, F641s were built.

Click the F1 Store logo on the right here to access the official F1 merchandise store. Claim a 10 per cent discount with this code: WINDSOR10. All of our commissions go to the WESEEHOPE Covid19 emergency fund.

F1 braking systems with Mercedes’ Mike Elliott

Mike Elliott, Technology Director of AMG-Mercedes Petronas F1, talks us through the braking systems of the Championship-winning Mercedes F1 car. The temperatures and the g-forces involved are mind-blowing; and, until the new F1 regs arrive (probably now in 2022), the brake suppliers in F1 will remain in fierce competition. Mercedes generally use Brembo calipers with Carbone Industrie discs but there’s always a lot of fine-tuning over a race weekend. With thanks to AMG-Mercedes Petronas Motorsport.

Click the F1 Store logo on the right here to access the official F1 merchandise store. Claim a 10 per cent discount with this code: WINDSOR10. All of our commissions go to the WESEEHOPE Covid19 emergency fund.

F1’s unlikeliest winner

All bets were off by the time they arrived at The Glen in ’66. Jack Brabham and his fabulous Brabham-Repcos had secured the world championship; John Surtees had switched mid-season from Ferrari to Cooper-Maserati, thus ending Maranello’s realistic title challenge (despite producing a car that could have won it). Dan Gurney had debuted his gorgeous Eagle, albeit still with 2.7 litre Climax engines. BRM had tried unsuccessfully to make their big 3-litre H16-engined cars serious runners. And Lotus, in the wake of that BRM disaster, vacillated between the 2-litre Climax-engined Lotus 33 and the Lotus 43-H16. As the field prepared for F1’s richest race to date, the US GP at Watkins Glen, Lotus’ Colin Chapman was unsure of whether to follow his head (race the 33) or his heart (delight the fans with the temperamental but throaty-sounding Lotus 43-H16). Aware of the recent success of big sports car racing in North America, he chose the latter course. And the rest is history.

This video includes little-seen footage of the 1966 USGP and a start-up, in more recent times, of the winning car.

Click the F1 Store logo on the right here to access the official F1 merchandise store. Claim a 10 per cent discount with this code: WINDSOR10. All of our commissions go to the WESEEHOPE Covid19 emergency fund.

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